Mommy Files: Food by the Color

When Y-Chromo was a baby, I would serve him only apple juice or Juicy Juice. There were two flavors of JJ that he loved, both colored red. At the time, it was easier to ask him if he wanted apple juice or “red” juice than to remember if we had raspberry or cherry juice open. One of my husband’s friends overhead me asking Y if he wanted red juice and commented, “Juice by the color? Like orange juice?”

I also used to make spinach fettucine with pesto sauce. Y-Chromo loved it. One time, I happened to be on the phone with my father when Y finished his serving and wanted more. He started pounding on the tray of his high chair and yelling, “New news.” Or would that be spelled Noo-noos? My dad asked, “What’s he yelling about?” I replied, “He wants more noodles.” (Noodles being easier to say than fettucine.) “Then give the boy more noodles!” Y’s favorite color has always been green, so spinach fettucine with pesto sauce became known as Green Noo-noos and eventually Green Noodles. By the time both children could say “noodles”, I had started to add tri-color cheese tortellini to the mix (the family was growing), but always and forever, in our family, pasta with pesto is known as green noodles.

 

 

 

Manuscript: Besieged by the Moon Cover Reveal & More!

Counting down to the release of the third book in the Service for Sanctuary series, BESIEGED BY THE MOON. 

Fated Mates.

Although werewolf EMT Parker Rowe is anxious to return home to begin his paramedic training, he stops to rescue a she-wolf from a mob. Turns out she isn’t just any she-wolf.

Phoebe McKinn was eight years old when she witnessed the most powerful man in Washington, DC slaughter her pack and family. For fifteen years she’s been preparing to avenge their deaths. While tracking her enemy she meets her fated mate and a branch of her pack she never knew existed.

Too bad exacting her revenge will probably get her killed . . . unless Parker can convince her surviving is the best revenge.

The release date is April 21, but you can preorder the book now from Amazon.

 

Moment for Valentine’s Day

Dating has changed drastically in my lifetime. Nowadays there are dating apps. I know several couples who met that way. Before apps, there was video dating. You went to the company’s office, made a short video about yourself, then hoped someone would read your profile, watch your video, and want to contact you. Before that were the personal ads in the newspaper. The randomness of the personals created all sorts of creepy, if not dangerous situations.

The best story I ever heard about how one couple met is a variation on the theme.

The woman was sitting at home one night listening to a radio call in show. (This was before podcasts). She found herself drawn to voice of a divorced father of two,  a medical doctor, who was looking for a nice girl to date.  So she called in.

The rest, as they say, is history. They are a lovely couple, with a lovely family, including grandchildren. He’s retired now. They travel around the country visiting their far-flung family.  Because she picked up the phone and made a call to a radio station.

Movie: Hidden Figures

The movie Hidden Figures is on my top 10 list of favorite movies of all time. I saw it three times in the theaters when it first came out. I cried every single time. When I watch it again, I’m sure I’ll cry again.

As Leslie Jones asked on SNL when the film came out: “Why didn’t I know about this?” Super intelligent women who made going into space possible. Black women who served their country despite all obstacles put in their way. These are people to celebrate.

I have always felt John Glenn was “my” astronaut. He became the first American to orbit Earth on my birthday. I was home sick from school and watched the coverage on TV. He gave me a wonderful birthday present that year.  In the movie, when he said, “Get the girl to check the numbers,” I nearly swooned.   My personal hero acknowledged girls could be smart.

Why didn’t any of us know about this?

 

 

 

Memory: The Start of a Family Tradtion

In late January of 1966, Central New York was hit with an epic blizzard that shut the area down for days. Here’s a link to some photos taken at the time.

I grew up in a rural area. My aunt, uncle and four cousins lived next door on one side, my grandmother and step-grandfather lived on the other side of us. My uncle and dad couldn’t get to their jobs, so there was lots of family time between efforts to dig out.  Here’s  a photo  of  my  dad  on  the  1934 Ford tractor  and  my  Grandpa  Jim  working  on clearing away  the snow.

It was during the blizzard that two of my family traditions began.

My parents pulled out the flour, sugar, eggs, and such and went on a baking spree. We worked together as a family. I recall my mom unearthing a cookie press she’d never used, finding a recipe for chocolate spritz cookies and using the cookie press to make them. They were wonderful. A pain to make compared to mom’s usual cookies (and my mom baked great cookies!), but worth the effort. And yes, my dad was also involved in the bake-fest.

The first lesson I learned was to always make sure there is a stockpile of food in the house come winter. Ingredients and basics. It’s a lesson I had to remind my son of when he moved out on his own. Even if you keep only cans of soup in the cupboard, make sure you have something to eat. You never know when a storm is going to hit. Which is why you’ll never find me out on the night before a predicted storm scrounging for bread and milk.  I’m always prepared.

The second lesson is that baking together during a snowstorm makes wonderful memories. Now, I didn’t often get to take snow days with my children, but the times I did, we pulled out a box or two of quick bread mix (I am not my mom) and baked together. I used the time to teach them fractions (if the recipe calls for half a cup, how many quarter cups should you use?) and other life skills. Plus we were spending time together. That was the important thing.

I hope their memories are as nice as mine.